FAQ’s2021-03-18T09:38:40+11:00

FAQ’s

Please find responses below to some frequently asked questions.

If you can’t find what you are looking for, please check out the Western Victoria Transmission Project Website.

North Ballarat Terminal Station and 220 to 500kV Line Upgrade2021-06-29T17:23:49+10:00

Despite mention of this in material released by AusNet, there has been no decision to upgrade the 220kV to a 500kV transmission line between Bulgana and Waubra.

As part of the EES, Ausnet Services is investigating the option to increase the amount of energy unlocked in Western Victoria, by changing the voltage of the 220kV section between Bulgana and Waubra to 500kV.  It has been identified in the Renewable Energy Zone Development Plan Directions Paper and is being actively considered by the Victorian Government. Further information on the REZ priorities can be found at https://tinyurl.com/azaxc4rf If this option is progressed for this project, the terminal station to be located to the north of Ballarat may not be required for this project.

As proponent of the project AusNet Services is currently working with DELWP, AEMO and their technical consultants to understand how a potential upgrade of the line would impact on the existing project.

Following the Bushfires Royal Commission, why aren’t transmission lines underground?2021-06-08T13:55:39+10:00

The Royal Commission into National Natural Disaster Arrangements was established on 20 February 2020 in response to the extreme bushfire season of 2019-20 which resulted in devastating loss of life, property and wildlife, and environmental destruction across the nation.

(Note: In both the 2009 and 2020 Royal Commission Reports, there is NO recommendation for 500kV overhead transmission lines to be placed underground, only low voltage powerlines)

Royal Commission into National Natural Disaster Arrangements 28 October 2020

Page 229

Australia’s electricity network ‘has a large number of very long lines which are expensive to maintain and vulnerable to natural hazards’. Power outages were a widespread cause of cascading failures during the 2019-2020 bushfires. We heard that during the 2019-2020 bushfire season, more than 280,000 customers from various energy providers experienced a bushfire-related power outage at some point. These outages were largely attributed to fire damaging more than 10,000 power poles and thousands of kilometres of powerlines, including those located underground.

Page 239 

Throughout the course of our inquiry, we also explored a range of additional actions that could be taken to mitigate natural disaster risks to critical infrastructure assets, including placing infrastructure (eg powerlines and telecommunications cables) underground to reduce exposure to natural disasters.

On shifting infrastructure assets underground, it was noted that this is not always possible due to the terrain, is significantly more expensive, and that, in any event, underground infrastructure may still be susceptible to damage from fires or flooding. Energy providers agreed that stand-alone power systems would increase network resilience and reduce the exposure of energy infrastructure assets, and therefore communities, to power outages, but the Australian Energy Market Commission assessed that uptake of these solutions would likely be relatively small.

2009 Victorian Bushfires Royal Commission Final Report 2009

Page 29 – Recommendation 27 

The State amend the Regulations under Victoria’s Electricity Safety Act 1998 and otherwise take such steps as may be required to give effect to the following:

  • the progressive replacement of all SWER (single-wire earth return) power lines in Victoria with aerial bundled cable, underground cabling or other technology that delivers greatly reduced bushfire risk. The replacement program should be completed in the areas of highest bushfire risk within 10 years and should continue in areas of lower bushfire risk as the lines reach the end of their engineering lives
  • the progressive replacement of all 22-kilovolt distribution feeders with aerial bundled cable, underground cabling or other technology that delivers greatly reduced bushfire risk as the feeders reach the end of their engineering lives. Priority should be given to distribution feeders in the areas of highest bushfire risk.

This recommendation has been accepted by the Victorian Government.

Electricity distribution businesses will be required to implement approximately $500 million in improvements to protection and controls on Victoria’s electricity network. This initiative will be funded by electricity distributors and will be recovered at a modest increase in power bills to customers.

The Victorian Government will provide up to $200 million for the replacement of powerlines in areas of highest bushfire risk over the next eight years.

(Note: In both the 2009 and 2020 Royal Commission Reports, there is NO recommendation for 500kV overhead transmission lines to be placed underground, only low voltage powerlines)

What are the dimensions of the towers and footings?2021-05-10T21:09:22+10:00
  • Infrastructure specifications vary due to topography and network voltage. The approximate specifications are:
    Dimension of tower base: 16m x 16m for 220kV; 20m x 20m for 500kV
  • Tower heights: 40m to 60m for 220kV; 60m to 80m for 500kV
    Span length: 450m to 550m for both 220kV and 500kV
  • Pile foundation: diameter ranging from 1.5m to 3m and depth 5m to 20m.
  • Tower hardstand: 40m x 40m for 220kV; 50m x 50m for 500kV. These areas include the tower base.
  • Stringing sites:  40m x 40m for both 220kV and 500kV.
    Access tracks: 6m wide.
  • Easement widths:  40m to 60m for 220kV; 70m to 100m for 500kV.
Are there grounds for terminating the contract with AusNet?2021-04-15T18:37:38+10:00

AEMO retain the right not to proceed and reimburse AusNet Services for costs incurred. Fundamentally, the grounds for termination are that the cost of the project is not to outweigh the economic benefits to Victorian electricity consumers.

(In my view, this is so subjective yet specific. How do they determine the economic impact to Victorian electricity consumers? Is it just the impact on electricity consumers or all Victorian’s? Factors such as loss of land values, loss of primary production, impacts on tourism, business, loss of regional appeal, all contribute to economic impact. Are AEMO going to factor all of that into the equation to determine economic benefits?)

Is there a process where we can lodge a complaint against the poor consultation process?2021-04-15T18:37:08+10:00

AEMO treats complaints of misconduct seriously. AusNet Services, as the proponent, is required to report all project-related complaints and outcomes to AEMO as part of ongoing progress reporting. All concerns raised with AEMO will be treated confidentially in the first instance. AEMO will seek consent before sharing information with AusNet Services and/or other third parties. To lodge a query with AEMO, please call the AEMO Support Hub on 1300 236 600 or use the Contact Us form available online. https://aemo.com.au/contact-us

AusNet Services treats complaints of misconduct seriously. AusNet Services will manage all complaints in accordance with the AusNet Services’ Customer Complaint and Dispute Resolution Policy. Email: customersupport@ausnetservices.com.au

Towers represent added risk to firefighting efforts. Why is this corridor even being considered?2021-04-15T18:36:24+10:00

The corridor through Darley, Coimadai and Merrimu is classified as a high bushfire risk area. The dry and open nature of vegetation makes this area dangerously susceptible for fire.

AusNet Services acknowledges its responsibility to understand and mitigate any increased fire risk posed by this project and designs, operates and maintains safe and reliable transmission networks that meet Australian standards. Our Transmission Vegetation & Easements Program focuses on maintaining public safety, mitigating bushfires, ensuring network reliability and maintaining the security and accessibility of the easements and transmission network. Furthermore, we work hand-in-hand with Emergency Management Victoria and Country Fire Authority Victoria to safely manage thousands of kilometres of transmission lines in the event of fire or other emergency.

As the project proponent, AusNet Services is undertaking a rigorous and transparent assessment of bushfire risk and ensuring that any risk is minimised and managed is a key priority for the project. The project is also subject to an Environment Effects Statement (EES) process which will provide for a transparent, integrated assessment of potential environmental impacts, including fire risk. This independent process which is managed by Victoria’s Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP).

What is the impact of underground on land use?2021-04-15T18:35:33+10:00

Overhead transmission lines have less impact on ongoing land use, giving property owners greater flexibility and the ability to do more with the land. For example, agriculture is permitted around overhead transmission lines, but not underground lines, which prohibits land uses that involve agriculture, gardens, trees and shrubs.

Murraylink represents a viable case-study. Why is the same project model not being followed?2021-04-15T18:35:01+10:00

It is important to note that the function and purpose of Murraylink is distinct to the need identified in the Western Victoria RIT-T. Murraylink is a bi-directional point-to-point transmission link connecting Victoria and South Australia. The WVTNP also has a far greater capacity than Murraylink, and multiple points of connection.

Can the EES process result in a review and redesign of the use of technology and overall project?2021-04-15T18:34:35+10:00

The Environment Effects Statement (EES) process must assess feasible alternatives. Alternatives must meet the project objectives; that is satisfy the need for the project; and ultimately to be constructed the alternatives must be economically viable. Further work is required to understand the project-specific economic costs of alternatives including undergrounding. The EES will consider the environmental impacts and benefits of alternative solutions. This assessment will inform the Minister of the level of impact and advantages and disadvantages of alternative designs.

The only way to mitigate impacts to the north of Darley is to avoid this area completely. Why does the northern alignment, that runs through Significant Landscape, still exist on the Project plan?2021-04-15T18:34:02+10:00

We understand the community is concerned about the visual impacts of the project. Throughout the Environment Effects Statement (EES) process the design will be revised to respond to environmental assessments and feedback from the community and other stakeholders. The avoid, minimise and mitigate hierarchy will be followed, however it should be noted that major projects, particularly a major project of the scale of the Western Victoria Transmission Network Project, cannot entirely avoid adverse impacts. At the conclusion of the EES process the Minister for Planning will consider the overall significance of potential effects relative to the likely benefits of the project.

Why was the value of natural assets not considered in the RIT-T but are considered under the EES?2021-04-15T18:32:47+10:00

AEMO acknowledges the WVTNP will have impacts on local communities, as well as environmental features within the area including natural assets. Under the RIT-T application guidelines, the value of natural assets, where unable to be economically costed, are not able to be included within the cost estimation process of the RIT-T.

The RIT-T is the first stage of the development and represents an early hurdle before a project can move on to the next stages of investment, planning and approvals. The social and environmental impacts will be assessed at subsequent stages of the planning and approvals processes including as part of the Environment Effects Statement (EES).

AusNet Services will engage with stakeholders to better understand the biodiversity values of biolinks.

Does Social License compete against cost?2021-04-15T18:32:10+10:00

The current regulatory framework assesses ISP projects according to their technical and economic merit over a 20-year planning horizon to guide governments, industry and consumers on the investments needed for an affordable, secure, sustainable and reliable energy future. AEMO recognises that this framework does not currently fully consider the social and environmental factors that underpin social licence. We consider engagement on the ISP as a first step in building social licence for the energy infrastructure projects that are required to support Australia’s world-leading energy transition.

The RIT-T framework is designed to promote efficient investment in, and efficient operation and use of, electricity services for the long-term interests of electricity consumers. In effect, this means selecting the investment option that is both technically feasible and delivers the highest net economic benefit.

AEMO appreciates and acknowledges the important social, environmental, amenity, and cultural matters raised by community members in relation to the project. As the project proponent, AusNet Services is committed to delivering a project that is sensitively designed, located and constructed to minimise environmental and social impacts. The social and environmental impacts will be assessed at subsequent stages of the planning and approvals processes including as part of the Environment Effects Statement EES).

Why is the project simply choosing the cheapest and most direct option?2021-04-15T18:38:41+10:00

The RIT-T framework is designed to promote efficient investment in, and efficient operation and use of, electricity services for the long-term interests of electricity consumers. In effect, this means selecting the investment option that is both technically feasible and delivers the highest net economic benefits to the National Electricity Market.

AEMO appreciates and acknowledges the important social, environmental, amenity, and cultural matters raised by community members in relation to the project. As the project proponent, AusNet Services is committed to delivering a project that is sensitively designed, located and constructed to minimise environmental and social impacts. AusNet is also responsible for securing the necessary planning and environment approvals. Fundamentally, the cost of the project is not to outweigh the economic benefits to Victorian electricity consumers.

(This last statement represents the grounds under which AEMO can terminate the contract)

Why was undergrounding of HVDC not considered as a credible option?2021-04-15T18:38:29+10:00

AEMO considered an underground option in the early stages of the Western Victoria RIT-T. Market and industry information indicated that per kilometre, building transmission cables underground would be in the order of up to 10 times more expensive compared to the equivalent overhead option. In comparison, an overhead option would deliver similar network benefits at a significantly lower cost to Victorian electricity consumers, who will ultimately fund this project.

High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) can be used overhead or underground. It was excluded as a credible option due to the need for multiple (minimum of four), expensive, large ‘converter stations’ to be built to integrate a HVDC solution into the existing network, which is High Voltage Alternating Current (HVAC).  If HVDC were to be used, all future generators would require an above-ground converter station, too. This is due to the need for associated infrastructure to integrate a HVDC solution into the existing network which is High Voltage Alternating Current (HVAC). Additional infrastructure may also be required to maintain adequate system strength.

Given the reduced flexibility for future generation connections, the cost of converter station infrastructure, and the additional system strength requirements, in this instance HVDC could not be considered technically or economically feasible under the RIT-T application guidelines. Accordingly, it was not included in market modelling as a credible option.

AEMO is not currently aware of any new information that contradicts the conclusion that an underground installation of the WVTNP would be significantly more costly. However, we acknowledge the public interest in seeing further details comparing underground designs relative to the proposed overhead project. Following the Environment Effects Statement (EES) scoping requirements provided by Victoria’s Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP), AusNet Services will consider undergrounding as well as a range of other project alternatives through the EES process.

Why is High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) not being considered?2021-04-15T18:29:35+10:00

High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) was considered in the early stages of the Western Victoria RIT-T. It was excluded as a credible option on the basis that it was not considered an economically feasible or technically efficient solution to reduce network congestion and unlock renewable energy resources in western Victoria. This is due to the need for multiple (minimum of four), expensive, large ‘converter stations’ to be built to integrate a HVDC solution into the existing network, which is High Voltage Alternating Current (HVAC). If HVDC were to be used, all future generators would require an above-ground converter station, too. Additional infrastructure may also be required to maintain adequate system strength.

Given the reduced flexibility for future generation connections, the cost of converter station infrastructure, and the additional system strength requirements, in this instance HVDC could not be considered technically or economically feasible under the RIT-T application guidelines. Accordingly, it was not included in market modelling as a credible option.

Was there any community consultation, or is this considered an ‘actionable’ route so the consultation didn’t happen?2021-04-13T14:50:57+10:00
The consultation process surrounding this project has been poor from the outset, to say the least. Community feedback has been provided to AusNet Services over the past 9 months via
  • Online Q&A sessions
  • A 32-page impact statement that I personally prepared
  • Online mapping tools to identify areas of significance
  • Thousands of letters of concern sent to AusNet Services, AEMO, the Victorian Government and Federal Governments. Replies to these letters have not been forthcoming and by all appearances, stakeholders fast-tracking this Project choose to bury their heads in the sand
  • Community drop-in sessions hosted b y AusNet Services.

While it may appear community consultation was undertaken to some extent, all of the above has resulted in nothing. The broad area of interest was recently refined to a narrow corridor which still includes a State Significant Landscape and the area to the north of Darley including Coimadai and Merrimu. From the communities perspective, the consultation process was a ‘tick-the-box’ exercise with no intent to alter the proposed route. To quote Ausnet Services; Through alignment selection and design the Project seeks to avoid areas of significance. It seems they forgot their own mission statement!

For Social License to Operate, AusNet need to place decision-making in the hands of the community and implement what the community decides, not use 100-year-old infrastructure that fails to enhance and conserve the natural environment. Transmission towers have been ruining sunsets and vandalising landscape character for over 100 years. When more environmentally conscious alternatives exist, it is baffling as to why they are not being considered. To say there are no alternatives, which is what we have been hearing, demonstrates unwillingness to conserve, protect and enhance the environment.
The need for an effective and efficient transmission network to transfer green energy generated in the south-western Victoria to the State power grid is recognised and supported but it is fundamental the various impacts on environment and community be considered. The WVTNP and all future transmission projects should investigate underground transmission alternatives to ensure the environment is both protected and preserved.
Are there any viable alternatives that you have identified?2021-04-13T14:50:16+10:00
Murraylink (commissioned in 2002) is a prime example of an alternative solution that is sensitive to the environment and communities. Murraylink utilises High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) Light technology and consists of two 180-kilometre long bipolar underground HVDC cables. The Murraylink HVDC bipolar interconnector is believed to be the world’s longest underground power transmission system, connecting the Riverland region in South Australia and Sunraysia region in Victoria through converter stations at Red Cliffs in Victoria and Berri in South Australia. The Murraylink project earned several Australian state and national awards for both environmental and engineering excellence. With the evolution in technology that has occurred since Murraylink, integration of HVDC into existing networks provides a range of additional advantages such as improving the stability of the existing power networks and facilitating the integration of renewable energy. As towers aren’t required for underground HVDC, the straight-line distance is not critical, therefore undergrounding can use existing easements and rights of way along roads and highways. This minimises environmental and community impact, speeds up project delivery and reduces cost.
Have you connected with other communities which have similar concerns to you?2021-04-13T14:49:50+10:00

We have connected with community groups along the entire 190km proposed alignment. As this represents a substantial distance, communities are impacted in different ways. Farming and Agriculture is the focus of many but the situation in Darley is quite different. There are 1000s of residents who will be impacted and our fight is more related to environment, landscape character, biodiversity, bushfire risk and impact on visual amenity to name a few. Our concerns are very similar to a group known as Solve Tasmania. They are fighting to conserve and enhance the character of significant landscapes. TasNetworks/UPC Renewables (under the umbrella of the ‘Marinus Project’) are proposing an industrial scale transmission line through their North-West region, levelling everything in its path. Loongana is a heavily forested and narrow valley between two ranges.  The proposed transmission line and easement will cut through the entire valley west to east.  It will become the dominant feature in the landscape and every resident will be directly impacted.

How many members does your group have? Are you all based in the area? 2021-04-20T16:03:33+10:00

Darley Power Fight is a group of around 1000 residents in Darley, Coimadai and Merrimu. We are united against high voltage transmission towers passing through our backyard. We came together through the realisation the transmission line will divide a narrow corridor between Darley and the Lerderderg State Park; altering landscape character, causing widespread damage to critical habitat for threatened species, increasing fire risk to the Park and thousands of residents, destroy our visual amenity, harm local agriculture and will impact land values. It will completely desecrate, in a few years, what nature has taken millions of years to create. The group was formed to represent this specific region and we are currently working on an awareness campaign to get more community members on-board. I certainly expect numbers to increase dramatically to more accurately reflect the number of residents impacted.

We are working together and with the Moorabool and Central Highlands Power Alliance (MCHPA) to increase pressure on AusNet and government to ensure alternate viable solutions are considered. The MCHPA represents the Moorabool Shire and Central Highlands inside and bounding the “area of interest” corridor.  The membership base for the larger group is in excess of 2,000 although I dont have exact numbers. Darley Power Fight is a sub-group of the MCHPA, fighting our own fight.

Can land within an easement still be used by the landowner?2021-04-01T01:52:33+11:00

While there are some restrictions to the use of land within a transmission line easement, there are a number of permitted land uses including:

  • Grazing and agriculture
  • Market gardens, orchards and horticultural nurseries (excluding buildings)
  • Water storage dams (subject to sufficient clearances)
  • Trees and shrubs with a mature growth height not exceeding three metres.

For more information about living with transmission easements, please refer to the A guide to living with transmission line easements(External link) on the AusNet Services website.

What is an easement?2021-04-01T01:53:05+11:00

AusNet Services owns and operates the majority of the electricity transmission system in Victoria. Our network of transmission towers and terminal stations support around 6,500 kilometres of conductors (the wires). The corridors of land on which this network is built are referred to as transmission line easements.

An easement is a right to access, occupy and use part of the land owned by another person for a particular purpose. For example, the construction and operation of a transmission line. Easements are usually subject to any conditions negotiated between the grantor and grantee of the easement, and are registered on the title to the land affected, creating a public record of the existence of the interest in the land.

An easement is generally considered the best possible form of land tenure available to accommodate a transmission line and obtaining easements for the construction and operation of transmission lines is standard practice in Victoria.

For more information about transmission easements, please visit the Transmission – Easement Use page(External link) on the AusNet Services website.

What new infrastructure is being proposed as part of this project and how big will it be?2021-04-01T01:53:50+11:00

The project will include approximately 190km of new transmission line infrastructure between Bulgana and Sydenham, a new terminal station to the north of Ballarat and several minor electricity infrastructure upgrades across western Victoria. The new infrastructure to be built as part of the project will include:

  • A new terminal station to the north of Ballarat with two new 1,000MVA 500/220kV transformers
  • A new 220kV double circuit transmission line from the Bulgana Terminal Station to the new terminal station, via the Waubra Terminal Station
  • A new 500kV double circuit transmission line from the Sydenham Terminal Station to the new terminal station
  • Upgrades to existing transmission infrastructure.

The typical size of a 220kV transmission tower is approximately 55m high and 12m wide. The typical size of a 500kV transmission tower is approximately 72m high and 16m wide.

Why can’t existing infrastructure be used/upgraded to deliver the required transmission capacity?2021-04-01T01:54:19+11:00

In recent decades, Victoria’s power system has changed significantly with the introduction of renewable energy and the retiring of some coal generators in the Latrobe Valley. The arrival of new energy resources in our energy mix has led to new generation hubs in locations outside the traditional generation hubs.

Western Victoria has become an attractive location for new renewable generation projects due to the availability of renewable energy resources. Existing transmission infrastructure in western Victoria is inadequate and unable to accommodate this increased generation, resulting in a constrained network.

The Regulatory Investment Test for Transmission (RIT-T) process undertaken by Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) to address network limitations in western Victoria identified a preferred investment option. This option requires the construction of new infrastructure between Bulgana and Sydenham to deliver the most efficient means of increasing transmission capacity in western Victoria to meet the long-term energy needs of consumers.

Who is the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO)?2021-04-01T01:54:42+11:00

AEMO is responsible for operating Australia’s largest gas and electricity markets and power systems. These include the National Electricity Market and interconnected power system in Australia’s eastern and south-eastern seaboard and the Wholesale Electricity Market and power system in Western Australia.

AEMO also operates the Victorian Declared Wholesale Gas Market and the Victorian gas transmission system; the wholesale gas Short Term Trading Market hubs in Adelaide, Sydney and Brisbane; the Wallumbilla Gas Supply Hub in Queensland; and the Moomba Gas Supply Hub in South Australia.

As Australia’s independent energy markets and power systems operator, AEMO provides critical planning, forecasting and modelling, and power systems security advice and services, helping to ensure Australians have access to affordable, secure and reliable energy. Further information is available at aemo.com.au

Who is delivering the project?2021-04-01T01:55:27+11:00

AusNet Services and its commercial division, Mondo, will build, own, operate and maintain the new infrastructure and minor upgrade works required for the project. The Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) selected AusNet Services to deliver the project following a competitive tender process.

AusNet Services is the largest energy network business in Victoria, owning and operating three regulated networks – electricity distribution, gas distribution and the state-wide electricity transmission network, including the existing Western Victoria transmission network. Headquartered in Melbourne, Australia, AusNet Services employs around 1,900 people to service 1.4 million consumers. For more information visit AusNet Services’ website, ausnetservices.com.au(External link).

Mondo is AusNet Services’ commercial business, responsible for enabling Australia’s energy future through the provision of a range of infrastructure, utility and community energy services. For more information visit Mondo’s website, mondo.com.au(External link).

What has happened so far?2021-04-01T01:56:25+11:00

In 2017 the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) commenced a Regulatory Investment Test for Transmission (RIT-T) to identify the most economical way of addressing limitations in the western Victoria transmission network.

The RIT-T is a regulatory process under the National Electricity Rules that requires AEMO to apply an economic cost-benefit test on new transmission network investment proposed for the National Electricity Market (NEM). It is designed to identify the option that delivers the highest net economic benefits to all those who produce, transport and consume electricity in the NEM, in the long-term interests of Australian energy consumers. The RIT-T process requires AEMO to undertake detailed market modelling and key stakeholder consultation as part of this assessment.

As part of the RIT-T process AEMO undertook stakeholder consultation with government, industry and consumers to identify the preferred transmission investment option to address network limitations in Western Victoria. AEMO’s stakeholder consultation included the opportunity for public submissions and participation in deep-dive industry forums at key stages of the RIT-T process.

For more information on the RIT-T visit aemo.com.au/initiatives/major-programs/western-victorian-regulatory-investment-test-for-transmission/

Where will the new power lines and terminal station be located?2021-04-01T01:56:58+11:00

The design, route and location of the new infrastructure, including transmission lines, towers and a terminal station, will be determined once community engagement and detailed environmental, heritage and social investigations have been completed.

Your input will be vital. We want to understand what is important to you; this will help us maximise community benefits and minimise potential project impacts.

What are the benefits of the project?2021-04-01T01:51:55+11:00

The Western Victoria Transmission Network Project will see major economic investment in western Victoria, creating new jobs, during and after construction.

The project will support the development of future energy resources in western Victoria, creating additional jobs and economic investment in the region.

This project will also support Victoria’s move towards a cleaner energy future.

Why is this infrastructure needed?2021-03-17T01:43:06+11:00

The current electricity network in western Victoria is congested and unable to take on all of the proposed renewable energy generated by wind and solar farms. This means renewable energy generators connected to the existing infrastructure, and future renewable generators that could be connected to the network, are not able to operate at full capacity. This critical, state-significant project will provide much needed capacity upgrades to the network, unlocking renewable resources in the region and maximising the productivity of these existing and new energy renewable generation assets, helping to protect consumers from paying more than necessary for their electricity.

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Welcome to the home of Darley Power Fight. A group of residents in Darley, Coimadai and Merrimu, united against high voltage transmission towers passing through our backyard. We came together through the realisation the transmission line will divide a narrow corridor between Darley and the Lerderderg State Park; altering landscape character, causing widespread damage to critical habitat for threatened species, increasing fire risk to the Park and thousands of residents, destroy our visual amenity, harm local agriculture and will impact businesses and property values. It will completely desecrate, in a few years, what nature has taken millions of years to create.

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